Latest Self & Professional Development Posts

NAMI-PA Conference Presentation in Oct

Family Members as Treatment Team Coordinators” 

This presentation, at the Oct. 25-26th state conference in Harrisburg, is Lisa’s 3rd presentation in 9 years at for NAMI-PA.

 

Caring, involved and informed family members can be the the best Treatment Team  Coordinators for loved ones with mental illness and substance abuse.

This workshop will engage family to understand and embrace the unique strength of their position, living with the symptoms of an ill loved one.  They will be guided to learn new ways of effective communication with doctors and therapists and be able to put in practice at home interpersonal tactics from DBT, MET and Mindfulness strategies.  As caregivers in a troubled family dynamic, they will learn to newly attend to their own needs, with sharing of excellent coping skills and resources for strength and resiliency, as well.

More details TBA.

 

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Kids, Emotional Intelligence & Psychosocial Ed.

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Lisa A. Miles  c 2013   Published on www.lisamilesviolin.com
All Rights Reserved
 

Anyone read Jennifer Kahn’s article in the New York Times Magazine this past Sunday?  (Reading, Writing and Emotional Intelligence, 9/15/13).  An overview of an excellent topic–the awareness and utilization of Emotional Intelligence where it has its most profound effect, within childhood.
 
“Emotions can either enhance or hinder your ability to learn,” says Yale senior psychological research scientist Marc Brackett, as quoted in Kahn’s well-researched piece.  That statement of course could end, as well, with the words and expressions “lead,” “be effective”…”function.”  The origins of each of these  have their start in childhood, and it is in childhood that essentially this component of the self be best understood and nurtured.
 
I’m taken with Emotional Intelligence (EI) theory– ever have been since first reading not the works of Daniel Goleman, who has well made it a household workforce name, but his wife Tara Bennett Goleman.  Her Emotional Alchemy, with elegant intro. by the Dalai Lama, captivated my senses, as I saw within its pages wisdom similar to the work of my fellow artist friends.  Mindfulness, creativity, and emotional response to life and challenges was something that resonated with me.  
 
Brackett continued on emotions: “They affect our attention and our memory.  If you’re very anxious about something, or agitated, how well can you focus…?”  This is but one aspect of EI, which addresses everything from being able to read the emotional dynamic of a situation to being able to more responsibly capitalize on and transform our own emotional assets and liabilities. (more…)

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Training & Leading While Understanding Emotional Dynamic

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Last week I wrote on The Dynamics of Emotion in Facilitating a Great Meeting. This article extends that conversation, with tactics common to Emotional Intelligence Theory.  For whether running a meeting, training and advising, or being called upon for other methods of group leadership, one needs to cultivate the emotional dynamic at play.

If you are up in front of others because of your wise advisements or simply coordination of a gathering, you have to judiciously give and take counsel from those you are charged to guide.  That involves active listening, observing, moving the pace along, showing compassion and strength… often all at the same time.  You have to be be able to know when folks are ‘hogging the floor’ or trying to evaporate into the shadows–and be able to graciously take over or draw out a person accordingly.  

A true facilitator helps to shift power in group discussion among the group, whether it be by individual-to-individual moderating or by throwing something on the table that needs mulled over before it gets lost.  One of such authority can not get distracted or bogged down and must be able to casually pivot when seriously needed.  (Or, seriously put a foot down and pull rank  if all hell breaks loose.)

For sure, a group leader and trainer must forge strong working relationships so that at most times there is a dotted line between your role as the point person or coach and those that are of your team. Always try to attune your antennae to what your group wants, what are they looking for, what they need and what would move them forward. Then it is your job to get them there. (more…)

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Employee Wellness Programs & the Affordable Care Act

Hiring Managers: Are you aware there are increased company incentives for Employee Wellness Program participation in the Affordable Care Act?

You need a unique consultant who can bring and advise on Mental Health & Self Development programs for your company– benefitting both the bottom line and employee engagement.

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The Dynamics of Emotion in Facilitating a Great Meeting

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Have you ever been to a group meeting poorly facilitated?  Sure you have.  

Not just the boring, check-the-phone on your lap kind, but the kind that happens when you arrive actually engaged around the topic at hand, came prepared to share and discuss, are surprisingly vividly awake… and then just sit dumbfounded at how bad a job the person supposedly in charge is in handling the dynamics.

Some may say, “Well not everyone is a born leader or facilitator.”  That is a valid point.  But anyone who has any business in leading a group at any time needs to know emotional dynamic.  Emotional intelligence, interwoven into basic facilitation tactics.

Managing relationships to move people in the right direction is one aspect of emotional intelligence, and certainly also a skill to bring into group facilitation.  For no matter what is on the agenda as content matter, the leader needs to be able to read the participants emotionally.  

(more…)

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For Your Pain & Suffering

Lisa A. Miles  c 2013   www.lisamilesviolin.com
All Rights Reserved

 

 

Marsha Linehan, founder of Dialectical Behavior Therapy, has pointed out a belief that has resounded with many, judging by support groups for families of the mentally ill and subsequent literature.  Essentially– Pain, with acceptance, is just pain.  But pain without acceptance is suffering.

Its useful, inspirational application spans everything from natural disaster trauma to tremendous burdens at work.  

Note the word “just.”  Loaded, you say?  Sure.  But nothing like what comes with the alternative.  Pain still, but not that which will drive one to misery.  Pain still present and identifiable, but not allowed to overwhelm, which is a far deeper level.

(more…)

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Two pieces on Dysfunctional Families and the work of Dr. Charles Whitfield

“Helpful, good books have been written over the last few decades about dysfunctional families and the wounding that is often carried from childhood into adulthood. Many have incorporated the belief that children in such families adopt particular roles which help them to manage and ease the pain.

Dysfunctional families are affected by mental illness, trauma from tragedy, or simply by being headed by individuals with very poor parenting skills. There is no pretty way around that statement and plenty of authors have courageously and professionally touched the subject, as a simple Internet or library search will show….”

 

View this article where it was originally published on PsychCentral

Lisa A. Miles c 2013

 

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“Charles L. Whitfield’s 1987 book Healing the Child Within is aimed at adult children of dysfunctional families. The ideas he presented synced up with the 12-step recovery movements for families afflicted by alcohol and addiction (Al-Anon, Nar-Anon). It made perfect sense that the pain of those with alcoholic parents was similar to that of individuals in families whose parents were dysfunctional even if not abusing substances….”

 

View this article where it was originally published on PsychCentral

 

Lisa A. Miles c 2013

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Mental Health: U.S vs. U.K.

View this article where it was originally published on PsychCentral

 

“The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will begin this fall in the United States, with the health care exchange signups at the state level. So it’s a good time to pause and reflect. What would an ideal American mental health system eventually look like, and could we get an idea or two from our friends?”

 

Lisa A. Miles c 2013

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The Psychology of Workplace Leadership: Strong, Steady Transformation

View this article where it was originally published on PsychCentral

 

“Starting with your team’s — and your own — talents, and factoring in the department’s accomplishments and motivation, drive to a higher level more naturally.  Enthusiasm, vitality, vision (individual and collective) will take you a lot farther than setting some goal outside the sphere of what your assets already are….”

 

Lisa A. Miles c 2013

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Teaching Mental Health in Junior High

View this article where it was originally published on PsychCentral

 

“Some children might start identifying what they are going through at home with an ill parent; others could begin to formulate an entirely new way of being when it comes to the stress and tension they’ll meet with throughout life. Many lives could be potentially changed if young people from junior high on began to learn signs and symptoms….”

 

Lisa A. Miles c 2013

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